Directives

@auth

Return the currently authenticated user as the result of a query.

type Query {
  me: User @auth
}

@all

Fetch all Eloquent models and return the collection as the result for a field.

type Query {
  users: [User!]! @all
}

This assumes your model has the same name as the type you are returning and is defined in the default model namespace App\Models. You can change this configuration.

If you need to use a different model for a single field, you can pass a class name as the model argument.

type Query {
  posts: [Post!]! @all(model: "App\\Blog\\BlogEntry")
}

@belongsTo

Resolves a field through the Eloquent BelongsTo relationship.

type Post {
  author: User @belongsTo
}

It assumes both the field and the relationship method to have the same name.

<?php

namespace App\Models;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;
use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Relations\BelongsTo;

class Post extends Model 
{
    public function author(): BelongsTo
    {
        return $this->belongsTo(User::class);
    }
}

The directive accepts an optional relation argument if your relationship method has a different name than the field.

type Post {
  user: User @belongsTo(relation: "author")
}

@belongsToMany

Resolves a field through the Eloquent BelongsToMany relationship.

type User {
  roles: [Role!]! @belongsToMany
}

It assumes both the field and the relationship method to have the same name.

<?php

namespace App\Models;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;
use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Relations\BelongsToMany;

class User extends Model 
{
    public function roles(): BelongsToMany
    {
        return $this->belongsToMany(Role::class);
    }
}

The directive accepts an optional relation argument if your relationship method has a different name than the field.

type User {
  jobs: [Role!]! @belongsToMany(relation: "roles")
}

@bcrypt

Run the bcrypt function on the argument it is defined on.

type Mutation {
  createUser(name: String, password: String @bcrypt): User
}

When you resolve the field, the argument will hold the bcrypt value.

<?php

namespace App\Http\GraphQL\Mutations;

class CreateUser
{
    public function resolve($root, array $args)
    {
        return User::create([
          'name' => $args['name'],
          // This will be the bcrypt value of the password argument
          'password' => $args['password']
        ]);
    }
}

@cache

Cache the result of a resolver.

The cache is created on the first request and is cached forever by default. Use this for values that change seldomly and take long to fetch/compute.

type Query {
  highestKnownPrimeNumber: Int! @cache
}

You can set an expiration time in seconds if you want to invalidate the cache after a while.

type Query {
  temperature: Int! @cache(maxAge: 300)
}

You can limit the cache to the logged in user making the request by marking it as private. This makes sense for data that is specific to a certain user.

type Query {
  todos: [ToDo!]! @cache(private: true)
}

@cacheKey

When generating a cached result for a resolver, Lighthouse produces a unique key for each type. By default, Lighthouse will look for a field with the ID type to generate the key. If you'd like to use a different field (i.e., an external API id) you can mark the field with the @cacheKey directive.

type GithubProfile {
  username: String @cacheKey
  repos: [Repository] @cache
}

@can

Check a Laravel Policy to ensure the current user is authorized to access a field. Set the name of the policy and the model to check against.

type Mutation {
  createPost(input: PostInput): Post @can(if: "create", model: "App\\Post")
}

This is currently limited to doing general checks on a resource and not a specific instance. The defined functions receive the currently authenticated user.

class PostPolicy
{
    public function create(User $user): bool
    {
        return $user->is_admin;
    }
}

@complexity

Place on fields to perform analysis to calculate a query complexity score before execution. Read More

type Query {
  posts: [Post!]! @complexity
}

You can provide your own function to calculate complexity.

type Query {
  posts: [Post!]!
    @complexity(resolver: "App\\Security\\ComplexityAnalyzer@userPosts")
}

A custom complexity function may look like the following. You may look up the complexity function signature

namespace App\Security;

class ComplexityAnalyzer {

    public function userPosts(int $childrenComplexity, array $args): int
    {
        $postComplexity = $args['includeFullText'])
            ? 3
            : 2;

        return $childrenComplexity * $postComplexity;
    }

@create

Applies to fields to create a new Eloquent model with the given arguments.

type Mutation {
  createPost(title: String!): Post @create
}

@delete

Delete a model with a given id field. The field must be an ID type.

type Mutation {
  deletePost(id: ID!): Post @delete
}

If you use global ids, you can set the globalId argument to true. Lighthouse will decode the id for you automatically.

type Mutation {
  deletePost(id: ID!): Post @delete(globalId: true)
}

You can also delete multiple models at once. Define a field that takes a list of IDs and returns a Collection of the deleted models.

type Mutation {
  deletePosts(id: [ID!]!): [Post!]! @delete
}

@field

Specify a custom resolver function for a single field.

In most cases, you do not even need this directive. Make sure you read about the built in directives for querying data and mutating data, as well as the convention based approach to implementing custom resolvers.

Pass a class and a method to the resolver argument and separate them with an @ symbol.

type Mutation {
  createPost(title: String!): Post
    @field(resolver: "App\\Http\\GraphQL\\Mutations\\PostMutator@create")
}

If your field is defined on the root types Query or Mutation, you can take advantage of the default namespaces that are defined in the configuration. The following will look for a class in App\Http\GraphQL\Queries by default.

type Query {
  usersTotal: Int @field("Statistics@usersTotal")
}

Be aware that resolvers are not limited to root fields. A resolver can be used for basic tasks such as transforming the value of scalar fields, e.g. reformat a date.

type User {
  created_at: String!
    @field(resolver: "App\\Http\\GraphQL\\Types\\UserType@created_at")
}

@find

Find a model based on the arguments provided.

type Query {
  userById(id: ID! @eq): User @find(model: "App\\User")
}

This throws an error when more than one result is returned. Use @first if you can not ensure that.

@first

Get the first query result from a collection of Eloquent models.

type Query {
  userByFirstName(first_name: String! @eq): User @first(model: "App\\User")
}

Other than @find, this will not throw an error if more than one items are in the collection.

@enum

Map the underlying value to an enum key. When dealing with the Enum type in your code, you will receive the defined value instead of the string key.

enum Role {
  ADMIN @enum(value: 1)
  EMPLOYEE @enum(value: 2)
}

@eq

Place an equal operator on a eloquent query.

type User {
  # this will filter a user's posts by the category.
  postsByCategory(category: String @eq): [Post] @hasMany
}

If the name of the argument does not match the database column, pass the actual column name as the key.

type User {
  postsByCategory(category: String @eq(key: "cat")): [Post] @hasMany
}

@event

Fire an event after a mutation has taken place. It requires the fire argument that should be the class name of the event you want to fire.

type Mutation {
  createPost(title: String!, content: String!): Post
    @event(fire: "App\\Events\\PostCreated")
}

@globalId

Converts an ID to a global ID.

type User {
  id: ID! @globalId
  name: String
}

Instead of the original ID, the id field will now return a base64-encoded String that globally identifies the User and can be used for querying the node endpoint.

@group

Apply common settings to all fields of an Object Type.

Set a common namespace for the @field and the @complexity directives that are defined on the fields of the defined type.

extend type Query @group(namespace: "App\\Models") {
  activeUsers @field(resolver: "User@getActiveUsers")
}

Set common middleware on a set of Queries/Mutations.

type Mutation @group(middleware: ["api:auth"]) {
  createPost(title: String!): Post
}

@hasMany

Corresponds to Eloquent's HasMany-Relationship.

type User {
  posts: [Post!]! @hasMany
}

You can return the related models paginated by setting the type.

type User {
  postsPaginated: [Post!]! @hasMany(type: "paginator")
  postsRelayConnection: [Post!]! @hasMany(type: "connection")
}

If the name of the relationship on the Eloquent model is different than the field name, you can override it by setting relation.

type User {
  posts: [Post!]! @hasMany(relation: "articles")
}

@hasOne

Corresponds to Eloquent's HasOne-Relationship.

type User {
  phone: Phone @hasOne
}

If the name of the relationship on the Eloquent model is different than the field name, you can override it by setting relation.

type User {
  phone: Phone @hasOne(relation: "telephone")
}

@in

Filter a column by an array.

type Query {
  # this will filter a user's posts by the category id(s).
  postsByCategory(category_id: [Int] @in): [Post] @hasMany
}

@inject

Inject a value from the context object into the arguments. This is really useful with the @create directive that rely on the authenticated user's id that you don't want the client to fill in themselves.

type Mutation {
  createPost(title: String!, content: String!): Post
    @create(model: "App\\Post")
    @inject(context: "user.id", name: "user_id")
}

@interface

Make sure you read the basics about Interfaces before deciding to use this directive, you probably don't need it.

You can point Lighthouse to a custom type resolver. Set the resolver argument to a function that returns the implementing Object Type.

interface Commentable @interface(resolver: "App\\GraphQL\\Interfaces\\Commentable@resolveType") {
  id: ID!
}

The function receives the value of the parent field as its single argument and must return an Object Type. You can get the appropriate Object Type from Lighthouse's type registry.

<?php

namespace App\Http\GraphQL\Interfaces;

use GraphQL\Type\Definition\Type;
use GraphQL\Type\Definition\ResolveInfo;
use Nuwave\Lighthouse\Schema\TypeRegistry;
use Nuwave\Lighthouse\Support\Contracts\GraphQLContext;

class Commentable
{
    /**
     * @var \Nuwave\Lighthouse\Schema\TypeRegistry
     */
    protected $typeRegistry;

    /**
     * @param  \Nuwave\Lighthouse\Schema\TypeRegistry  $typeRegistry
     * @return void
     */
    public function __construct(TypeRegistry $typeRegistry)
    {
        $this->typeRegistry = $typeRegistry;
    }

    /**
     * Decide which GraphQL type a resolved value has.
     *
     * @param  mixed  $rootValue The value that was resolved by the field. Usually an Eloquent model.
     * @param  \Nuwave\Lighthouse\Support\Contracts\GraphQLContext  $context
     * @param  \GraphQL\Type\Definition\ResolveInfo  $resolveInfo
     * @return \GraphQL\Type\Definition\Type
     */
    public function resolveType($rootValue, GraphQLContext $context, ResolveInfo $resolveInfo): Type
    {
        // Default to getting a type with the same name as the passed in root value
        // TODO implement your own resolver logic - if the default is fine, just delete this class
        return $this->typeRegistry->get(class_basename($rootValue));
    }
}

@method

Call a method on the target model. This comes in handy if the data is not accessible as an attribute (e.g. $model->myData) but rather via a method like $model->myData(). It requires the name argument.

type User {
  mySpecialData: String! @method(name: "findMySpecialData")
}

@middleware

Run Laravel middleware for a specific field. This can be handy to reuse existing middleware.

type Query {
  users: [User!]! @middleware(checks: ["auth:api"])
}

You can define middleware just like you would in Laravel. Pass in either a fully qualified class name, an alias or a middleware group - or any combination of them.

type Query {
  users: [User!]! @middleware(
    checks: [
        "auth:api",
        "App\\Http\\Middleware\\MyCustomAuth",
        "api"
    ]
  )
}

If you need to apply middleware to a group of fields, you can put @middleware on an Object type. The middleware will apply only to direct child fields of the type definition.

type Query @middleware(checks: ["auth:api"]) {
  # This field will use the "auth:api" middleware
  users: [User!]!
}

extend type Query {
  # This field will not use any middleware
  posts: [Post!]
}

Other than global middleware defined in the configuration, field middleware only applies to the specific field it is defined on. This has the benefit of limiting errors to particular fields and not failing an entire request if a middleware fails.

There are a few caveats to field middleware though:

  • The Request object is shared between fields. If the middleware of one field modifies the Request, this does influence other fields.
  • They not receive the complete Response object when calling $next($request), but rather the slice of data that the particular field returned.
  • The terminate method of field middleware is not called.

If the middleware needs to be aware of GraphQL specifics, such as the resolver arguments, it is often more suitable to define a custom field directive.

@model

Enable fetching an Eloquent model by its global id, may be used for Relay. Behind the scenes, Lighthouse will decode the global id sent from the client to find the model by it's primary id in the database.

type User @model(class: "App\\User") {
  id: ID! @globalId
}

@neq

Place a not equals operator != on an Eloquent query.

type User {
  # this will filter a user's posts that do not have the provided category.
  postsByCategory(category: String @neq): [Post] @hasMany
}

@node

Store a type's resolver functions in Lighthouse's node registry. The resolver argument has to specify a function which will be passed the decoded id and resolves to a result.

type User @node(resolver: "App\\GraphQL\\NodeResolver@resolveUser") {
  name: String!
}
public function resolveUser(string $id): \App\User

The typeResolver is responsible for determining the GraphQL type the result belongs to. Lighthouse provides a default implementation, but you can override it if the need arises.

type User @node(
  resolver: "App\\GraphQL\\NodeResolver@resolveUser"
  typeResolver: "App\\GraphQL\\NodeResolver@resolveNodeType"
  ) {
  name: String!
}
public function resolveNodeType($value): \GraphQL\Type\Definition\Type

@notIn

Filter a column by an array.

type Query {
  # this will filter a user's posts that are not in the array of id(s).
  postsByCategory(category_id: [Int] @notIn): [Post] @hasMany
}

@paginate

Return a paginated list. This transforms the schema definition and automatically adds additional arguments and inbetween types.

type Query {
  posts: [Post!]! @paginate
}

The type of pagination defaults to paginator, but may also be set to a Relay compliant connection.

type Query {
  posts: [Post!]! @paginate(type: "connection")
}

By default, this looks for an Eloquent model in the configured default namespace, with the same name as the returned type. You can overwrite this by setting the model argument.

type Query {
  posts: [Post!]! @paginate(model: "App\\Blog\\BlogPost")
}

If simply querying Eloquent does not fit your use-case, you can specify a custom builder.

type Query {
  posts: [Post!]! @paginate(builder: "App\\Blog@visiblePosts")
}

Your method receives the typical resolver arguments and has to return an instance of Illuminate\Database\Query\Builder.

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\DB;
use Illuminate\Database\Query\Builder;
use GraphQL\Type\Definition\ResolveInfo;

class Blog
{
    public function visiblePosts($root, array $args, $context, ResolveInfo $resolveInfo): Builder
    {
        return DB::table('posts')
            ->where('visible', true)
            ->where('posted_at', '>', $args['after']);
    }
}

@rename

Rename a field on the server side, e.g. convert from snake_case to camelCase.

type User {
  createdAt: String! @rename(attribute: "created_at")
}

@rules

Validate an argument using Laravel's built-in validation rules. Can be defined on Field Arguments and Input Object Values.

type Query {
  users(
    countryCode: String @rules(apply: ["string", "size:2"])
  ): User
}

input CreatePostInput {
  title: String @rules(apply: ["required"])
  content: String @rules(apply: ["min:50", "max:150"])
}

You can customize the error message for a particular argument.

@rules(apply: ["max:140"], messages: { max: "Tweets have a limit of 140 characters"})

@scalar

Point Lighthouse to your scalar definition class. Learn how to implement your own scalar.

Lighthouse looks into your default scalar namespace for a class with the same name. You do not need to specify the directive in that case.

scalar DateTime

Pass the class name if it is different from the scalar type.

scalar DateTime @scalar(class: "DateTimeScalar")

If your class is not in the default namespace, pass a fully qualified class name.

scalar DateTime @scalar(class: "Nuwave\\Lighthouse\\Schema\\Types\\Scalars\\DateTime")

Creates a full-text search argument.

This directive will make an argument use Laravel Scout to make a full-text search, what driver you use for Scout is up to you.

The search method of the model is called with the value of the argument.

type Query {
  posts(search: String @search): [Post!]! @paginate
}

Normally the search will be performed using the index specified by the model's searchableAs method. However, in some situation a custom index might be needed, this can be achieved by using the argument within.

type Query {
  posts(search: String @search(within: "my.index")): [Post!]! @paginate
}

@update

Update an Eloquent model.

type Mutation {
  updatePost(id: ID!, content: String): Post @update
}

If the name of the Eloquent model does not match the return type of the field, set it with the model argument.

type Mutation {
  updateAuthor(id: ID!, name: String): Author
    @update(model: "App\\User")
}

@union

Make sure you read the basics about Unions before deciding to use this directive, you probably don't need it.

You can point Lighthouse to a custom type resolver. Set the resolver argument to a function that returns the implementing Object Type.

type User {
  id: ID!
}

type Employee {
  employeeId: ID!
}

union Person @union(resolver: "App\\GraphQL\\UnionResolver@person")
  = User
  | Employee

The function receives the value of the parent field as its single argument and must return an Object Type. You can get the appropriate Object Type from Lighthouse's type registry.

<?php

namespace App\GraphQL\Unions;

use GraphQL\Type\Definition\Type;
use GraphQL\Type\Definition\ResolveInfo;
use Nuwave\Lighthouse\Schema\TypeRegistry;
use Nuwave\Lighthouse\Support\Contracts\GraphQLContext;

class Person
{
    /**
     * @var \Nuwave\Lighthouse\Schema\TypeRegistry
     */
    protected $typeRegistry;

    /**
     * @param  \Nuwave\Lighthouse\Schema\TypeRegistry  $typeRegistry
     * @return void
     */
    public function __construct(TypeRegistry $typeRegistry)
    {
        $this->typeRegistry = $typeRegistry;
    }

    /**
     * Decide which GraphQL type a resolved value has.
     *
     * @param  mixed  $rootValue The value that was resolved by the field. Usually an Eloquent model.
     * @param  \Nuwave\Lighthouse\Support\Contracts\GraphQLContext  $context
     * @param  \GraphQL\Type\Definition\ResolveInfo  $resolveInfo
     * @return \GraphQL\Type\Definition\Type
     */
    public function resolveType($rootValue, GraphQLContext $context, ResolveInfo $resolveInfo): Type
    {
        // Default to getting a type with the same name as the passed in root value
        // TODO implement your own resolver logic - if the default is fine, just delete this class
        return $this->typeRegistry->get(class_basename($rootValue));
    }
}

@where

Specify that an argument is used as a where filter.

You can specify simple operators:

type Query {
  postsSearchTitle(title: String! @where(operator: "like")): [Post] @hasMany
}

Or use the additional clauses that Laravel provides:

type Query {
  postsByYear(created_at: Int! @where(clause: "whereYear")): [Post] @hasMany
}

@whereBetween

Verify that a column's value is between two values.

Note: You will need to add a key to the column to want to query for each date

type Query {
  # this will filter a user's posts between a set of dates.
  postsBetweenDates(
    start_date: String! @whereBetween(key: "created_at")
    end_date: String! @whereBetween(key: "created_at")
  ): [Post] @hasMany
}

@whereNotBetween

Verify that a column's value lies outside of two values.

Note: You will need to add a key to the column to want to query for each date

type Query {
  postsBetweenDates(
    start_date: String! @whereNotBetween(key: "created_at")
    end_date: String! @whereNotBetween(key: "created_at")
  ): [Post] @hasMany
}